LPN Career, Schools and Training Overview

If you're interested in working in health care but can't or prefer not to make the significant educational investment often required for other medical careers, training to become an LPN could be a good choice. These nurses are employed in a wide variety of settings, including nursing care facilities, hospitals, doctors' offices and home health care services.

LPN is short for licensed practical nurse. This role is referred to as an LVN, or licensed vocational nurse, in Texas and California, but apart from the name, there is no tangible difference between the two. Supervised by a registered nurse or doctor, LPNs work closely with patients and are responsible for basic medical care. This can involve tasks such as the following:

  1. Administering medication and injections
  2. Changing patient bandages
  3. Helping patients dress, bathe and eat
  4. Keeping medical records
  5. Monitoring patient vitals
  6. Reporting a patient's health status to doctors and registered nurses

LPNs might also be called on to provide emotional support to patients -- another reason why nurses are nicknamed "angels in comfortable shoes."

LPN Training Options 

 

Online LPN Training Programs  

 

Good Qualities to have as an LPN  

 

Advancing your Nursing Career  

 

More information on being an LPN  


Schools offering LPN Programs

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